Podcast: Schools or Prisons?

Posted on 4 CommentsPosted in #BlackLivesMatter, #ThisStopsToday, Activists, Allies, Breaking Down Racism, Parents, Students, Teachers

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In some neighborhoods, public schools feel more like prisons than schools. In this episode, former social worker and attorney Helen Higginbotham discusses the policing of children in schools with BLACK AND CUBA director Robin J. Hayes.

Written/Directed/Produced by:
Ariana Arancibia
Phyllis Ellington
Echo Sutterfield

Executive Produced by:
Dr. Robin J. Hayes

Recorded in New York City at TNS_Logo1_Small_RGB

Podcast: Segregation Education Nation

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Activists, Allies, Breaking Down Racism, Parents, Students, Uncategorized

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In this episode of Breaking Down Racism, a former PTA president of an East Village, New York City school speaks candidly about inequality in New York City’s public school system.  What do you think about segregation in public schools? Tell us in the comment section below.

Produced/Directed/Written by: Alina Baboolal, Nicole Moore and Phuong Nguyen

Hosted/Executive Produced by: Robin J. Hayes, PhD

Recorded at The New School in New York City.

Students at Public School 188 in Manhattan 2009 by Annie Tritt courtesy The New York Times

 

"I Wish to Inquire for My People"

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in Activists, Allies, Artists, Authors, Parents, Prisoners, Scholars, Students, Teachers, Uncategorized

Screen Shot 2016-01-01 at 10.15.06 AM

On January 1, 1863 President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation making slavery illegal in the US.  Soon afterwards, newspapers such as the Southwestern Christian Advocate in New Orleans were flooded with letters and advertisements by freedmen searching for their mothers, children, and spouses who had been sold or disappeared, or who had fled the brutality of plantation owners.  These letters reveal no one ever adjusted to slavery. And the trauma the experience caused endured long after Lincoln’s decree. How does slavery continue to impact African American families today?

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Jafari Allen’s ¡Venceremos? The Erotics of Black Self-making in Cuba

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Allies, Authors, Parents, Scholars, Students, Teachers

EDUCATORS: Jafari Allen’s ¡Venceremos? The Erotics of Black Self-making in Cuba is a ground-breaking book that is essential to understanding the post-revolution Cuba in terms of issues of race, gender, sexuality, and so on. Integrate it easily into your classroom with our complete syllabus guide based on Black and Cuba!

http://blackandcuba.tumblr.com/CollegesandUniversities

Jafari meme

Andrea Smith, Rachel Dolezal and Reading Realness

Posted on 3 CommentsPosted in #BlackLivesMatter, Activists, Allies, Artists, Black Resistance Screening List, Field Notes, Parents, Prisoners, Scholars, Students, Teachers, Uncategorized
(from l. to r.) Rachel Dolezal, Dorian Corey and Andrea Smith
(from l. to r.) Rachel Dolezal, Dorian Corey and Andrea Smith

I am, in the words of Black twitter, #ActualBlack.  I say this not to endorse “identity policing” but to point out:

  1. I have parents, grandparents and great grandparents who were forced to cope with the following forms of White supremacy (in chronological order): the TransAtlantic Slave Trade, lynching, segregation, mass incarceration, and microaggressions.
  2. My body, skin, hair, voice, accent (or lack of accent), sashay, and personal aesthetics are to some degree disturbing in all public and private institutions (except for prisons and the morgue).
  3. I did not sign up for this club, but I am proud to be a member.

In all seriousness,  I have been thinking a lot about  the question: Why has the outing of Rachel Dolezal and Andrea Smith as  White – allegedly – caused such a sensation?

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Glossary: Environmental Racism

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Activists, Allies, Parents, Students, Teachers, Uncategorized
Image Courtesy of The Cross Roads Fund
Image Courtesy of The Cross Roads Fund

The trip through ER can be a scary, threatening and life changing experience for people of color.

I am not talking about a trip to the emergency room, but a trip through life for the people who have to deal with environmental racism. If you are unfamiliar, environmental racism is the oppression of people of color through environmental degradation. According to Do Something, African Americans are 79 percent more likely to live in areas with industrial waste facilities, compared to Whites. The effects of living within close proximity to toxic dumping sites can have long-term effects on community well-being, specifically affecting the neighborhood water, air, and food quality.
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Today at 2pm EST: Black and Cuba Director Featured on New York's WBAI

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Activists, Allies, Artists, Black Resistance Screening List, Field Notes, Parents, Prisoners, Scholars, Students, Teachers

Hayes Photo 2014 10Dr. Robin J. Hayes, director of the award-winning documentary Black and Cuba will be on New York City’s WBAI today Tuesday April 14 at 2pm EST to discuss the film and “Feeling a Foreigner” on the Artsy Fartsy Show.  Listen live or download here.

Black Women Breastfeeding

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Parents, Uncategorized

When I was pregnant, many of my friends told me how wonderful it is to breastfeed your child. Constantly referring it to “liquid gold” and its endless health benefits. But when the time came, I felt tremendous anxiety. I had so many questions that I ultimately found myself sharing my struggles with my friends, upon which they responded with answers and encouragement.

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